Archive for February, 2011

More Than Child’s Play: Why Physical Activity Matters

February 28th, 2011

Increased use of cars and video games, the reduction of physical education and availability of unhealthy food all contribute to high rates of childhood obesity and sedentary lifestyles in Kentucky and across the country.  But, there are ways to help all children be physically active, improving their health as well as their academic, emotional and social well-being.  Viewers explore the issue in More Than Child’s Play:  Why Physical Activity Matters, part of KET’s Be Well health initiative.  This program is funded in part by the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. 

You can view the video at KET’s by clicking on the following link:

http://www.ket.org/health/morethanchildsplay/

Through With Chew Week (Feb 21 – 25) – Friday

February 25th, 2011

Link to Video

Through With Chew Week (Feb 21 – 25) – Thursday

February 24th, 2011

Link to Video

Through With Chew Week (Feb 21 – 25) – Wednesday

February 23rd, 2011

Link to video

Through With Chew Week (Feb 21 – 25) – Tuesday

February 22nd, 2011

Through with Chew Week (Feb 21 – 25) – Monday

February 21st, 2011

Link to video

It is not too late to get your flu shot!!

February 17th, 2011

The Martin County Health Department still has flu vaccine.  Come in today to receive your vaccincation.  We are open Monday through Friday from 8am to 4pm.  If you have any questions, you may call us at 606-298-7752

Be Smart About Your Heart: Control the ABCs of Diabetes

February 17th, 2011

Be Smart About Your Heart: Control the ABCs of Diabetes

 If you’re one of the more than 25.8 million Americans with diabetes, you are at high risk for heart attack and stroke. Heart disease is more likely to strike you – and at an earlier age – than it is to strike your friends and family without diabetes. In fact, 2 out of every 3 people with diabetes will die of a heart attack or stroke.

 But you can fight back. You have the power to prevent heart attack and stroke by controlling the ABCs of diabetes.

 A is for A1C. The A1C test (sometimes known as the HbA1c or hemoglobin A1c test) measures your average blood glucose (sugar) over the last 3 months.

B is for blood pressure. High blood pressure makes your heart work too hard.

C is for cholesterol. Bad cholesterol, or LDL, builds up and clogs your arteries.

 

Work with Your Health Care Provider

Ask your health care provider these questions:

  • What are my ABC numbers? Your A1C level should be tested at least twice a year. Blood pressure should be checked at each visit and cholesterol should be tested at least once a year.
  • What should my ABC target number be?  For most people with diabetes, the goals are A1C below7, blood pressure below 130/80, and LDL cholesterol below 100.
  • What actions should I take to reach my ABC target numbers? You and your health care provider will put together an action plan of lifestyle changes and medications, if needed, to help you reach and maintain your goals for the ABCs of diabetes.

 

Take Action Now.

You can take action now to lower your risk for heart attack and stroke and other diabetes problems. Work with your health care provider, and get started now:

  • Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity, such as brisk walking, on most days of the week.
  • Eat less fat and salt.
  • Eat more fiber – choose whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and beans.
  • Stay at a healthy weight.
  • Stop smoking – ask your provider for help.
  • Take medicines as prescribed.
  • Ask your doctor about taking aspirin.
  • Ask others to help you manage your diabetes.

 

For more information on the link between diabetes and heart disease, contact NDEP at 1-800-438-5383 or http://www.ndep.nih.gov.

 

The National Diabetes Education Program promotes awareness of the ABCs of diabetes through its Be Smart About Your Heart. Control the ABCs of Diabetes campaign. NDEP, the leading federal government source of information about diabetes prevention and control, is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and 200 public and private partners.

Tobacco Cessation Classes Scheduled

February 16th, 2011

The next series of Cooper-Clayton Tobacco Cessation classes is scheduled to begin Wednesday April 6.

Cooper-Clayton is a comprehensive, 13-week program that helps participants stop smoking with peer support, educational guidance and nicotine replacement therapy. The classes will meet from 11 to 12 p.m. on Wednesdays starting April 6, at the Martin County Health Department, 136 Rockcastle Road, Inez, Kentucky.

The Cooper-Clayton classes are $1 (one dollar) per class which includes the cost of program book and nicotine patches, gum or lozenges.

Participants have had much success with the Cooper-Clayton program because it combines nicotine replacement therapy with a weekly support group. As many as 45 percent of heavy smokers who use the Cooper-Clayton method, successfully stop smoking.

To register for the Cooper-Clayton classes, please call 298-7752 or stop by the Martin County Health Department, 136 Rockcastle Road, Inez, Kentucky.

For more information about the classes or the Health Department’s tobacco program, please call Geneva Wallen at 298-7752 or visit www.martincountyhealth.org.

Cooper-Clayton is a comprehensive, 13-week program that helps participants stop smoking with peer support, educational guidance and nicotine replacement therapy. The classes will meet from 11 to 12 p.m. on Tuesdays, starting April 20, at the Martin County Health Department, 136 Rockcastle Road, Inez, Kentucky

Cooper-Clayton is a comprehensive, 13-week program that helps participants stop smoking with peer support, educational guidance and nicotine replacement therapy. The classes will meet from 11 to 12 p.m. on Tuesdays, starting April 20, at the Martin County Health Department, 136 Rockcastle Road, Inez, Kentucky.

The Cooper-Clayton classes are $1 (one dollar) per class which includes the cost of program book and nicotine patches, gum or lozenges.

Participants have had much success with the Cooper-Clayton program because it combines nicotine replacement therapy with a weekly support group. As many as 45 percent of heavy smokers who use the Cooper-Clayton method, successfully stop smoking.

To register for the Cooper-Clayton classes, please call 298-7752 or stop by the Martin County Health Department, 136 Rockcastle Road, Inez, Kentucky.

For more information about the classes or the Health Department’s tobacco program, please call Geneva Wallen at 298-7752 or visit www.martincountyhealth.org.

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The Cooper-Clayton classes are $1 (one dollar) per class which includes the cost of program book and nicotine patches, gum or lozenges.

Participants have had much success with the Cooper-Clayton program because it combines nicotine replacement therapy with a weekly support group. As many as 45 percent of heavy smokers who use the Cooper-Clayton method, successfully stop smoking.

To register for the Cooper-Clayton classes, please call 298-7752 or stop by the Martin County Health Department, 136 Rockcastle Road, Inez, Kentucky.

For more information about the classes or the Health Department’s tobacco program, please call Geneva Wallen at 298-7752 or visit www.martincountyhealth.org.