Archive for the ‘Diabetes’ category

Better body image helps weight loss

July 27th, 2011

London, July 18 (IANS) Improving body image helps in weight loss programs based on diet and exercise.

Obesity is known to increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease and can significantly shorten life expectancy.

Technical University of Lisbon’s Pedro J. Teixeira, who led the research, said: ‘Body image problems are very common amongst overweight and obese people, often leading to comfort eating and more rigid eating patterns, and are obstacles to losing weight.’

‘Our results showed a strong correlation between improvements in body image, especially in reducing anxiety about other peoples’ opinions, and positive changes in eating behaviour.’

Researchers from Technical and Bangor universities (Spain and Britain, respectively) enrolled overweight and obese women on a year-long weight loss programme, reports the International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Half the women were given general health information about good nutrition, stress management, and the importance of looking after themselves, according to a Technical University statement.

The other half attended 30 weekly group sessions where issues such as exercise, emotional eating, improving body image and the recognition of, and how to overcome, personal barriers to weight loss and lapses from the diet were discussed.

Women in the second group found that the way they thought about their body improved and that concerns about body shape and size were reduced.

Compared to the first group, they were better able to self-regulate their eating and they lost much more weight, losing ann average seven percent of their starting weight compared to less than two percent for the first group.

–Indo-Asian News service

Heat may mean trouble for patients with diabetes

July 22nd, 2011

Heat may have adverse effects in patients with diabetes and those with the disease need to take extra precautions, health professionals warned. Blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes may go down as a result of more energy being used to regulate body temperature, said Southeast Regional Chief Medical Officer Cathy Palmier.

Source

Dentists can identify undiagnosed diabetes

July 21st, 2011

NEW YORK, July 15 (UPI) — Dental visits may offer a way to help identify people with diabetes or pre-diabetes who are unaware of their condition, U.S. researchers say.

Senior author Dr. Ira Lamster, dean of Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, and colleagues recruited approximately 600 people visiting a dental clinic in New York who were age 40 or older if non-Hispanic white, and 30-years-old or older, if Hispanic or non-white, who had never been told they have diabetes or pre-diabetes.

About 530 patients with at least one additional self-reported diabetes risk factor — family history of diabetes, high cholesterol, hypertension or overweight/obesity — received a periodontal examination and a fingerstick, point-of-care hemoglobin A1c test.

To assess and compare the performance of several potential identification protocols, the study participants returned for a fasting plasma glucose test.

The study, published in the Journal of Dental Research, found for the at-risk population among the dental patients, a simple examination of two dental parameters — number of missing teeth and percentage of deep periodontal pockets — was effective in identifying patients with unrecognized diabetes or pre-diabetes.

Source: UPI.COM

ATTENTION MEN! Control Your Diabetes. For Life… And For Your Family.

June 3rd, 2011

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ATTENTION MEN!

Control Your Diabetes. For Life… And For Your Family.

by the National Diabetes Education Program

Almost 11 million men age 20 or older currently have diabetes in the United States. That’s more than 10 percent of the total male U.S. population. Men with diabetes and their families can face devastating complications from diabetes, especially since people with diabetes are at a high risk for heart attack and stroke. Diabetes can also lead to blindness, kidney disease, loss of a toe or foot, and erectile dysfunction. But there is good news. Although diabetes is a serious disease, taking care of yourself and your diabetes can help you avoid long-term problems and live a long and healthy life.

Men with diabetes can lower their chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes complications by managing the ABCs of diabetes A1C, Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol.

· A is for the A1C test. It measures your average blood glucose level over the past three months. The goal for most people with diabetes is below 7.

· B is for blood pressure. High blood pressure makes your heart work too hard. The goal for most people with diabetes is below 130/80.

· C is for cholesterol. Bad cholesterol, or LDL, builds up and clogs your arteries. The LDL goal for most people with diabetes is below 100.

It’s essential for men with diabetes to take action to reach their ABC targets. Work with your health care team to develop a self-care plan. Ask your health care team about your ABC and blood glucose targets, how and when to test your blood glucose, and how to use the results to manage your diabetes. Take your medications even when you feel good and if you smoke, get help to quit. Use your diabetes meal plan and if you do not have one, talk to your health care team. Stay at a healthy weight by using your meal plan and moving more – try to get 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity most days of the week.

Ask for the support of your family and loved ones and make managing your diabetes a family affair. Eat healthy foods together at meal times, such as fruits and vegetables, fish, lean meats, chicken or turkey without the skin, dry peas or beans, whole grains, and low-fat or skim milk and cheese. Limit fried foods and avoid foods that are high in fat, sugar, and salt. Drink water more often. If you don’t normally help with grocery shopping or meal preparation, get involved! When eating out, take time to look over the menu and make healthy choices, such as starting with a salad or sharing an entree. Order the smallest size meal instead of the larger, super-sized versions at fast-food restaurants.

There are lots of things you can do with your family to be more physically active. Make a walking “date” with family members. For family fun, play soccer, basketball, or tag with your children. When you involve your family in your activities, you are more likely to stick to your program. Take action to manage your diabetes, not only for your own health, but for the health of your family.

To get your free copy of 4 Steps to Control Your Diabetes. For Life. and more tips on how to manage your diabetes, contact the National Diabetes Education Program at 1-800-438-5383 or http://www.ndep.nih.gov and click on the Control Your Diabetes. For Life. campaign.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with the support of more than 200 partner organizations.

A Diabetes Friendly Meal Everyone Can Enjoy

April 5th, 2011

A Diabetes Friendly Meal Everyone Can Enjoy

by the National Diabetes Education Program

Knowing what to serve and eat for dinner can sometimes be a challenge – especially for people with diabetes. While eating healthy foods is important for everyone, it’s essential for people with diabetes. Diabetes is a disease that results in high glucose, or sugar levels in the blood, which can lead to serious complications. For the 25.8 million people with diabetes in this country, making healthy food choices and being physically active is crucial to managing their diabetes.

Whether you are a person with diabetes or a family member or friend, you can prepare a meal that is healthy and tastes great. Look for recipes that are low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars. Experiment with recipes that include fruits and vegetables, fish, lean meats, chicken or turkey without the skin, dry peas or beans, and low-fat or nonfat milk and cheese. Other healthy ingredients are foods high in fiber, such as whole grain cereals, breads, crackers, rice, and pasta. To give an example of what to serve as a healthy meal, the National Diabetes Education Program suggests a recipe, along with other foods to complete the meal, that everyone can enjoy—whether you have diabetes or not.

What’s For Dinner?

When planning a meal, start with a salad appetizer. Baby spinach leaves with seasonal fresh vegetables or fruits like sugar snap peas or sliced pears go nicely with a low-fat vinaigrette dressing. For the main course, stick with lean meats or fish. Below you’ll find a recipe for baked salmon. Designed to serve six people, it takes about half an hour to prepare. Nutrition information, including carbohydrate grams, is provided.

Entree: Baked Salmon Dijon*

Ingredients:

1 C fat-free sour cream

2 tsp dried dill

3 Tbsp finely chopped scallions

2 Tbsp Dijon mustard

2 Tbsp lemon juice

1 ½ lb salmon fillet with skin (cut in center)

½ tsp garlic powder

½ tsp black pepper

Fat-free cooking spray as needed

Instructions: Preheat oven to 400 °F. Whisk sour cream, dill, onion, mustard, and lemon juice in small bowl to blend. Lightly oil baking sheet with cooking spray. Place salmon, skin side down, on prepared sheet. Sprinkle with garlic powder and pepper, then spread with the sauce. Bake salmon until just opaque in center, about 20 minutes.

Nutrition Information Per Serving: Calories 196, Total Fat 7 g, Saturated Fat 2 g, Cholesterol 76 mg, Sodium 229 mg, Fiber less than 1 g, Protein 27 g, Carbohydrates 5 g

* Recipe taken from Keep the Beat: Heart Healthy Recipes from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

A great side dish to serve with salmon is brown rice. Cook the rice with garlic, ginger, or green onions to give it more flavor. For dessert, serve a selection of fresh fruits of the season or a small scoop of fat-free or low-fat frozen yogurt or sorbet instead of regular ice cream. On special occasions, try a twist on traditional fruit pie by adding oats and almonds to the crust. It makes for a crunchy treat!

Eating healthy foods doesn’t mean sacrificing taste. One of the best ways to tell if a meal is both healthy and something you’ll like is by knowing its ingredients. When you do the preparation and cooking, you know exactly what’s going into it, and more importantly, what’s not! You can find more examples of healthy recipes by searching online for NHLBI’s “Heart-Healthy Recipes,” “A Healthier You” Recipes, or Fruits & Veggies Matter’s “Recipe Finder.”

For more information about making healthy food choices for people with diabetes and free resources to help manage diabetes, contact the National Diabetes Education Program at http://www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or 1-888-693-NDEP (6337). Bon appétit!

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the support of more than 200 partner organizations.

Assisting Patients in Understanding Their Risk for Diabetes Can Help Prevent Diabetes in their Future

March 22nd, 2011

Knowing about your risk for type 2 diabetes is the first step toward preventing or delaying the onset of the disease or promoting an early diagnosis. People at risk for type 2 diabetes can take action to lower their risk for the disease by making – and maintaining – healthy lifestyle changes. With early diagnosis and treatment, people with diabetes may prevent the development of diabetes-related health problems, such as heart disease, blindness, kidney disease, stroke, amputation, and even death. Diabetes Alert Day, observed annually the fourth Tuesday in March, is a one-day wake-up call to inform the public about the seriousness of diabetes, and to urge them to know their risk. Helping at-risk patients learn about their risk for developing type 2 diabetes is a critical step in counseling them to prevent diabetes and improve health outcomes. 

Reminders for Health Care Professionals:

 

  • Knowing their risk for type 2 diabetes helps patients take steps toward prevention. Urge patients to take charge of their health by taking the Diabetes Risk Test.
  • Family history plays a key role in the risk for developing type 2 diabetes. When discussing medical history, ask patients if they have a mother, father, brother, or sister with diabetes. Encourage them to start the conversation with family members today.
  • Gestational diabetes increases the future risk for diabetes in mothers and their children. In addition to inquiring about a family history of type 1 or type 2 diabetes, ask patients if they have had a history of gestational diabetes during pregnancy, and if their mother had gestational diabetes. Women with a history of gestational diabetes can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing a small amount of weight and becoming more physically active. They can lower their child’s risk for type 2 diabetes by helping them not become overweight, serving healthy foods, and being active as a family. 
  • Progression to type 2 diabetes is not inevitable. Overweight, at-risk patients can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes by losing a small amount of weight – as little as 5 to 7 percent (10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person) – and becoming more physically active.  
  • Type 2 diabetes prevention is a family affair. Encourage patients to make a plan that includes healthy lifestyle changes. For support, they can ask family members to join them. Specific recommendations include eating smaller portions by making half their plate veggies and/or fruit, one-fourth whole grains, and one-fourth protein. Recommend that they try to be active for at least 30 minutes a day, at least five days a week. To help them reach this goal, suggest that they split their physical activity into three, daily 10-minute sessions. 
  • An estimated one out of every four people with diabetes has the disease and does not know it. Recommend testing for pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes to your patients who are at high-risk.   

To help patients learn more about their risk for developing type 2 diabetes, contact the National Diabetes Education Program at 1-888-693-6337 or visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org to order free resources such as Your GAME PLAN to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes, It’s Never Too Early to Prevent Diabetes, and Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes; all are available in English or Spanish.

Be Aware of Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

March 22nd, 2011

Anybody can develop diabetes, but some people are more at risk than others.  For example, if you have a family history of diabetes, you are at increased risk for developing the disease, especially if a close family member–mother, father, brother, or sister–has diabetes.

 Some women are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes because they were diagnosed with diabetes during a pregnancy.  This is called gestational diabetes or GDM.  If your mother had gestational diabetes when she was pregnant with you, you may be at an increased risk for becoming obese and developing type 2 diabetes.

 Knowing your risk for type 2 diabetes is an important first step toward preventing or delaying the onset of the disease. Find out your risk by taking the Diabetes Risk Test.

 In addition to a family history and a history of GDM, some other risk factors for type 2 diabetes include being:

  • 45 years of age or older
  • Overweight or obese
  • An African American or person of African Ancestry, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander

 While there are some risk factors that you cannot change, such as family history and age, there are risk factors associated with your lifestyle that you can change, such as being more physically active and maintaining a healthy weight. Be sure to talk with your health care provider and find out what you can do to lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

 The good news is that people can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes by making lifestyle changes, such as losing a modest amount of weight (if overweight) by being more physically active and making healthy food choices. If you are overweight, create a lifestyle plan that includes losing a small amount of weight–5 to 7 percent (10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person)–and being more physically active.

 Here are some simple steps you can take:

  • Make healthy food choices such as fruits and vegetables, fish, lean meats, poultry without skin, dry beans and peas, whole grains, and low-fat or skim milk and cheese.
  • Choose water to drink.
  • Eat smaller portions. Make half your plate vegetables and/or fruits; one-fourth a whole grain, such as brown rice; and one-fourth a protein food, such as lean meat, poultry or fish, or dried beans.
  • Be active at least 30 minutes, 5 days per week to help you burn calories and lose weight. You don’t have to get all your physical activity at one time. Try getting some physical activity during the day in 10 minute sessions, 3 times a day. Choose something you enjoy. Ask family members to be active with you.
  • To help you reach your goals, write down all the foods you eat and drink and the number of minutes you are active. Review it each day.

 NDEP has free resources to help you learn more about your risk for diabetes, as well as ways to help you lower your risk. Call 1-888-693-NDEP (1-888-693-6337) or visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org for more information on how to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. Ask for Your GAME PLAN to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes, a tip sheet called It’s Never Too Early to Prevent Diabetes, and a tip sheet for children at risk called Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes, in English or Spanish.

 The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the support of more than 200 partner organizations.

Millions of Americans Have Diabetes and Don’t Know It

March 22nd, 2011

Millions of Americans Have Diabetes and Don’t Know It

On Diabetes Alert Day, Take Action to Learn Your Risk

In observance of Diabetes Alert Day (March 22), the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) and the Martin County Health Department are encouraging people to take NDEP’s Diabetes Risk Test at http://ndep.nih.gov/resources/ResourceDetail.aspx?ResId=252   to find out if they are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

Nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes – including an estimated 1,300 Martin Countians.  It is estimated that nearly one-third of the people with diabetes do not know that they have the disease.  An estimated 79 million adults are estimated to have pre-diabetes, placing them at increased risk for developing the disease.

According to the NDEP, “Diabetes is a serious disease, particularly when it is left undiagnosed or untreated.  Everyone should be aware of their risk for diabetes.  If you have a family history of diabetes – such as a mother, father, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes – or if you had diabetes during pregnancy – you need to know that you are at increased risk. 

Other risk factors for diabetes include being overweight, physically inactive, and being over the age of 45. Diabetes also is more common in African Americans, people of African Ancestry, Hispanics/Latinos, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders.

If left undiagnosed or untreated, diabetes can lead to serious health problems such as heart disease, blindness, kidney disease, stroke, amputation, and even death.  With early diagnosis and treatment, people with diabetes can delay or prevent the development of these health problems.

If you are at risk for diabetes, the good news is that you can take action now to lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes by making – and maintaining – healthy lifestyle changes.

Studies have shown that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed by losing a small amount of weight – 5 to 7 percent (10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person) – and becoming more active. Action steps include making healthy food choices and being active at least 30 minutes, five days per week. One way to help people achieve their health goal is to write down everything they eat and drink and the number of minutes they are active each day. They should review their notes daily.

The Martin County Health Department will be offering a Diabetes Self-Management course in June.  Call the health department at 298-7752 to register for the course.

Keeping Feet Healthy and Happy

March 8th, 2011

Keeping Feet Healthy and Happy

by the National Diabetes Education Program

Healthy feet are happy feet. Keeping feet healthy is essential for people with diabetes—and the reason why setting aside a moment each day to take care of your feet is so important. People with diabetes need to work with their health care team to keep their blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol as close to normal as possible. Doing so may help prevent or delay diabetes-related foot, eye, kidney, and heart problems.

To avoid serious foot problems that may lead to toe, foot, and  leg amputations, ask your doctor to plan a daily activity program that is right for you. Have your doctor check the sense of feeling and pulses in your feet at least once a year. Diabetes can make feet numb and you may not feel an injury. Pay special attention to any loss of feeling in your feet, changes in the shape of your feet, and foot ulcers or sores that do not heal.

To care for their feet, people with diabetes need to:

  • Check for sores, cuts, or bruises. Call your doctor if healing does not begin after one day.
  • Wash your feet in warm water and dry well between your toes.
  • Keep your feet soft and smooth by rubbing lotion on the tops and bottoms of them.
  • Ask your doctor or podiatrist about the best way to take care of corns or calluses.
  • Wiggle your toes and move your ankles for five minutes, two or three times a day. This  helps with blood flow.
  • Keep toenails trimmed weekly and ask your health care team for help if you can’t see or reach them.
  • Wear athletic or walking shoes that fit well. Make sure they are comfortable from the start and have enough room for your toes.
  • Never walk barefoot – not even indoors.

Medicare covers foot care if you have nerve damage in either foot due to diabetes. It allows a foot exam every six months by a podiatrist or other foot care specialist. You do not need a doctor’s prescription for this exam.

For a free copy of Take Care of Your Feet for a Lifetime, contact the National Diabetes Education Program at http://www.ndep.nih.gov or 1-800-438-5383.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the support of more than 200 partner organizations.

A Resource for College-Age Students with Diabetes

March 7th, 2011

If you have patients with diabetes that are in college and are looking for a supportive social network, Students With Diabetes might be a good resource.

Students With Diabetes is a group devoted to understanding the challenges facing college students living with diabetes. Members of these campus-based groups strategize ways to meet those challenges and succeed both in the classroom and in their diabetes management.

The dream of this organization began with the diagnosis of a college student in 1993. That student, Nicole Johnson, was told at diagnosis to drop out of school, give up on her career dreams, and live a predictable life. Today, Nicole is the executive director of Bringing Science Home, the organization that created Students With Diabetes.

To learn more about the organization, visit  www.studentswithdiabetes.com